Friday, 12 September 2014

WILL YOUR ARREST VIDEO BE GOING ONLINE!!America is rushing to outfit cops with cameras, but even experts aren’t sure of the laws regulating the storage of the videos they capture—or determining who exactly has access.

In the aftermath of Ferguson, where the death of an unarmed teenager sparked weeks of protests, police departments across America are outfitting their officers with wearable cameras.  The devices themselves raise plenty of legal and privacy questions, but ever bigger issues loom about what happens after they are shut off.
Police departments are already outsourcing their video evidence to private companies, creating problems so knotty and new that even the ACLU doesn’t have answers for them. Among them:
        • How long will evidence be stored, and how will police departments verify the information has actually been wiped after its supposed deletion date?
        • Will federal law enforcement and intelligence agencies like the FBI and NSA need warrants and subpoenas to view the digital evidence in private companies’ cloud storage? And will they deal with local police departments or go directly to the private storage services?
        • Will the public get to see the police footage, for example, when there is evidence of misconduct?
        • What happens when a private company’s server is hacked and evidence is lost or compromised?
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For years now, the online video masses and professionals have known they’re part of something ground-breaking, something that will change the way people consume media. Recently, two studies have come along to prove these beliefs are on the right track.

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